CONTENTS ~ INTRODUCTION ~ PLAN A ~ PLAN B ~ PLAN C ~ PLAN D
PLAN E ~ PLAN F ~PLAN G ~ PLAN H ~PLAN I ~ PLAN K ~ PLAN L
PLAN M ~ PLAN N ~ PLAN O ~ PLAN P ~ GLOSSARY

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The irregular outline of this design is charming yet it remains affordable to construct due to the simple nature of its various parts. Inside this pleasant dwelling, ground floor spaces flow gently through wide openings into one another, offering the occupants a sense of openness not ordinarily expected in a modest home. These spaces, while convenient to one another, remain very separate and distinct however -- this is to prevent the problem that most 'open plans' pose -- that feeling of living in just one big room. To the left of the entrance, the dining room features a built-in china closet exactly matching in its dimensions the arch leading to the kitchen -- both openings flank the center line of the room and align perfectly with an oversized window opposite. The kitchen is arranged with every important work area only steps apart, and all only a short distance from the dining table. All new homes should include a few frills; here they include a wide, airy foyer with room enough for furniture, and a living room with four notable attributes: a fireplace; a ceiling open to the roof above; a built-in bookcase (the location and size of which balances the entranceway) and lastly, windows on three sides of the room.

Secluded at the rear of the foyer are entrances to the cellar stairs, to the first-floor bathroom, to a coat closet, and to the master bed room which occupies the quietest and most private corner of the building. To conserve valuable wall space, both closets and the entrance door to the master bed room are reached through a single arched opening into the chamber; similarly, ease of furnishing was considered in locating the two windows of this special room. Upstairs are three bedrooms (two having built-in bookshelves) and a second bathroom. Depending on the exterior design chosen, window locations, sizes and types to these rooms will vary; space for steps to the (optional) attic has been provided for, A nice feature of this story is the open feeling the arrangement and dimensions of the stairwell provides; if the budget allows, an operable glass skylight would be a dramatic and useful addition in this area.

CAPE COD (Plan 'I' Design No. 26) ~ See an Exploded View

A careful mix of fenestration, cladding and roof types, an irregular outline and varied silhouette will cause this snug 'Cape Cod' style house -- from the day it is completed -- to appear as if it had stood on its foundations for generations; added to, lived in and softened by time and nature. The gracefully sweeping, deeply overhanging 'bell-cast' eaves; the sturdy, significantly placed central chimney, the warmth and personality given by the 'Dutch' door, differing window types and traditional, paneled shutters -- these bespeak American architecture at its finest, and convey the sense of a welcoming family homestead too. In the colonial era shingles, though very weathertight, were laborious to produce and so were used sparingly, often only on either northern or, as in this design, gable walls. Attention to numerous such details sets this design apart.


~ ITALIANATE (Plan 'I' Design No. 27) ~

It is curious how the addition of a porch costing only a modest sum can alter the temperament of a design; here, the dwelling appears solid and large, well-bred but clearly, authoritatively, dominating its site. Detailed but uncluttered, the reserved use of ornament on this stately residence imparts an aura of civility and clarity; it is noble in bearing but softly spoken about it. Popular in the 1860's, the 'Italianate' stylefeatures hipped roofs, deeply overhanging eaves supported by elaborate brackets; 'eye brow' windows on the uppermost story (a holdover from the immediately preceding 'Greek revival style'); tall, elongated windows; and delicate, narrow porches (then knownas a 'Piazza') having slender columns with muted decoration. Other features, as accurate as they are elegant, which may be included should the budget allow, include the use of french doors, additional brackets, and a double door at the entrance.


GERMAN HALF-TIMBERED (Plan 'I' Design No. 28) ~

More theatrical in silhouette yet also heavier looking than 'English Tudor', Germanic half-timbered buildings never-the-less employ many of the same materials and details, and has remained a favorite building style in America for many decades. Whether it is in the qualities of the style itself, or the associations we make with it and its origins, this type of structure seems most suitable to cooler climes. The design illustrated shows the inclusion of a garage, situated in such a way as to emphasize the romantic, sculptural composition of this dwelling's various parts. The drama of the residence is further highlighted by means of a splendid buttress thrusting forward, continuing the line of the main roof, and by the picturesque tapering of the chimney as it rises. The truncated gables, known as a 'jenkins-head' roof, completes this building's timeless countenance.

Architectural plans and other basic information for these and all the homes shown on this site, along with dozens of beautiful illustrations and extensive descriptive text are available in our 75 page, soft-cover publication "THE AFFORDABLE HOUSE"

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CONTENTS ~ INTRODUCTION ~ PLAN A ~ PLAN B ~ PLAN C ~ PLAN D
PLAN E ~ PLAN F ~PLAN G ~ PLAN H ~PLAN I ~ PLAN K ~ PLAN L
PLAN M ~ PLAN N ~ PLAN O ~ PLAN P ~ GLOSSARY